LASIK or PRK? Which is right for me? Animation.

Eye treatments / Lasik or PRK

This video is available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/all-animations/eyes-and-vision-videos/-/medias/8db69a94-957b-47f9-963f-07c31544caaa-lasik-and-prk-comparison-narrated-animation
Voice by: Sue Stern.
©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved.
Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia
Perfect for patient education purposes.
All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
LASIK, or "laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis," is the most commonly performed laser eye surgery to treat myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. The goal of the treatment is to reshape the cornea to correct the refractive error of the eye.
The cornea is the transparent dome-shaped structure in front of the eye. The cornea refracts light and accounts for about two-thirds of the eye's total optical power. Altering the curvature of the cornea changes the way light rays enter the eye. As a result, the light rays can be focused properly onto the retina for clearer vision.
For nearsighted people, the laser is used to flatten the cornea. For farsighted people, the cornea is made steeper. For patients with astigmatism, the laser is used to smooth the irregularly-shaped cornea into a more regular shape.
The outer layer of the cornea - the epithelium – is capable of replacing itself within a few days after being damaged or removed. The deeper layer of the cornea – the stroma, on the contrary, is a permanent corneal tissue with very limited regenerative capacity. The stroma, if reshaped by a laser, will remain that way permanently.
In this procedure, a thin, circular "FLAP" is created in the surface of the cornea to gain access to the permanent corneal tissue. This can be done with a mechanical cutting tool called a microkeratome, OR, for a blade-free experience, by a femtosecond laser. An excimer laser is then used to remove some corneal tissue to reshape the cornea. Excimer laser uses cool ultraviolet light beams to vaporize microscopic amounts of tissue in a precise manner to accurately reshape the cornea. The excimer laser is computer-controlled and is programmed based on the patient’s refractive error. The flap is then laid back in place and is allowed to heal.
LASIK eye surgery is mostly painless and can be completed within minutes. Improved vision can usually be seen overnight.

PRK, or photorefractive keratectomy, was the first type of laser eye surgery for vision correction and is the predecessor to the popular LASIK procedure. In PRK, NO flap is created. Rather, the epithelial cells on the eye surface are simply removed. An excimer laser is then used to reshape the cornea just like it does in LASIK.
The vision correction outcomes of PRK surgery are comparable to those of LASIK, but the recovery period is longer. This is because the epithelium is completely removed in PRK and it takes a few days to regenerate. PRK patients also have more discomfort and haziness of vision in the first few days after the surgery. Improved vision also takes longer to achieve.
PRK does, however, offer certain advantages. Because PRK does not involve creation of a flap, which contains both epithelial and deeper stromal tissue, the entire thickness of the stroma is available for treatment. The treatment range is therefore higher. This is particularly useful for patients with high levels of myopia or for those whose cornea is too thin for LASIK. PRK is also free of flap-related complication risks.

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This video is available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/all-animations/eyes-and-vision-videos/-/medias/8db69a94-957b-47f9-963f-07c31544caaa-lasik-and-prk-comparison-narrated-animation

Voice by: Sue Stern.

©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved.

Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia

Perfect for patient education purposes.

All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

LASIK, or "laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis," is the most commonly performed laser eye surgery to treat myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism. The goal of the treatment is to reshape the cornea to correct the refractive error of the eye.

The cornea is the transparent dome-shaped structure in front of the eye. The cornea refracts light and accounts for about two-thirds of the eye's total optical power. Altering the curvature of the cornea changes the way light rays enter the eye. As a result, the light rays can be focused properly onto the retina for clearer vision.

For nearsighted people, the laser is used to flatten the cornea. For farsighted people, the cornea is made steeper. For patients with astigmatism, the laser is used to smooth the irregularly-shaped cornea into a more regular shape.

The outer layer of the cornea - the epithelium – is capable of replacing itself within a few days after being damaged or removed. The deeper layer of the cornea – the stroma, on the contrary, is a permanent corneal tissue with very limited regenerative capacity. The stroma, if reshaped by a laser, will remain that way permanently.

In this procedure, a thin, circular "FLAP" is created in the surface of the cornea to gain access to the permanent corneal tissue. This can be done with a mechanical cutting tool called a microkeratome, OR, for a blade-free experience, by a femtosecond laser. An excimer laser is then used to remove some corneal tissue to reshape the cornea. Excimer laser uses cool ultraviolet light beams to vaporize microscopic amounts of tissue in a precise manner to accurately reshape the cornea. The excimer laser is computer-controlled and is programmed based on the patient’s refractive error. The flap is then laid back in place and is allowed to heal.

LASIK eye surgery is mostly painless and can be completed within minutes. Improved vision can usually be seen overnight.

PRK, or photorefractive keratectomy, was the first type of laser eye surgery for vision correction and is the predecessor to the popular LASIK procedure. In PRK, NO flap is created. Rather, the epithelial cells on the eye surface are simply removed. An excimer laser is then used to reshape the cornea just like it does in LASIK.

The vision correction outcomes of PRK surgery are comparable to those of LASIK, but the recovery period is longer. This is because the epithelium is completely removed in PRK and it takes a few days to regenerate. PRK patients also have more discomfort and haziness of vision in the first few days after the surgery. Improved vision also takes longer to achieve.

PRK does, however, offer certain advantages. Because PRK does not involve creation of a flap, which contains both epithelial and deeper stromal tissue, the entire thickness of the stroma is available for treatment. The treatment range is therefore higher. This is particularly useful for patients with high levels of myopia or for those whose cornea is too thin for LASIK. PRK is also free of flap-related complication risks.

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